Author Topic: Series II - SN 84 3267  (Read 1903 times)

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« on: February 15, 2004, 03:04:19 AM »
This is my favorite bass, the Goldielocks  bass.  'Not too fancy, not too plain, just right.'  It sounds wonderful and plays the same.  Walnut always has been my favorite wood, since I was a child.  Regardless of any other basses I acquire, this will stay my favorite.  
 

 
(How was I supposed to know there actually was a Goldielocks bass in the archives????)
 
(Message edited by poor_nigel on March 12, 2004)

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2004, 03:11:31 AM »

 
I have little idea of exactly what kind of walnut was used to make this bass, but it has a red tone in places you seldom see.  It is striking in person, especially in sunlight.

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2004, 03:19:32 AM »

 
The bodies and necks of the older Alembics are thicker than the new ones.  I believe this is why there are two electronics cavities on the newer ones, as they are too thin to put all the electonics in the main cavity.  The necks are closer to Gibson necks, in their feel.  I prefer the newer necks, but this one is fine as is.  It still plays great and has been buffed to a matte finish so it plays with a 'silky' feel to it.

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2004, 03:28:19 AM »

 
I have two irritations on this bass.  One will go away when I have the parts gold plated (It came in chrome plated, which I am not fond of).  The other is that the headstock was done in flamed koa.  I would have it redone in walnut, but it is perfect wood, just where it is.  The symetry in which it frames the head is typical of attention to detail in most Alembic instruments.  I am sure this will stay as is.  This picture does the wood no justice at all.

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2004, 03:39:25 AM »

 
A quick way to tell the condition of a crown-head Alembic is to check the point of the crown.  This bass is about as close to mint as you can get and still be played regularly.
 
As with old Jaguar E-Types, this bass could be considered a Series one and a half.  It has a combination of the old and new mixed.  Schallers are of the new type, so replacing the chrome was a phone call away.  It has the serial number on the fretboard, but also has a brass truss rod cover.  I ran out of gold screws and have not ordered more yet, for the machine heads.

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2004, 03:52:47 AM »

 
This is actually the case for my 20th Anniversary bass.  The body shapes are identical.  However, on newer basses (I am assuming all here), the bridge is about 1/2 to 3/4 forward, making the newer basses longer and a bit more access to the higher notes, as the whole neck is moved forward.  Also making the newer ones a touch more neck heavy.  You can kind of see how cramped the headstock is in the case.  Bare fit, where the 20th sits in the case perfectly.  Ah, one more item that needs to be ordered.  I highly suggest going directly through Calzone for these weigh-a-ton cases, and saving yourself $100 over buying them through Cases-2-Go and others.  Do the template gig, and it comes perfect for that particular bass.

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2004, 04:09:50 AM »
Correction:
The body of my 84 Series II is actually a bit wider than that of my 20th Anniversary model.  The Series II still fits in the case, but not easily, like the bass it was manufactured for.
 
Summary of diiferences is then:
Older basses 'assumed' to be thicker and wider in the body and have thicker necks and are shorter in overall length.  I wish I had a newer Series II here to compare it to, so I don't have to assume my 20th Anniversary has the body of a newer Series II.   If anyone would like to ship me theirs, please feel  free to do so.  I doubt you will get it back, but know it went to a good home . . .  
 
BTW - Ain't the star inlays cool!  Again, not too fancy, not too plain - Perfect!

dela217

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2004, 06:24:45 AM »
That is one fine bass!  I have been told that Alembic's bodies are now thinner to try to make them lighter.  In doing so, the electronics are moved to the upper cavity of the bass.  I personally like the thickness of the older ones.  It's what I am used to.  I do not know if the 20'th Anniversary is the same thickness as the new Series basses, but I think it is.  It would make sense anyway.
 
I think those inlays are great.  I have seen another with those same inlays.  It was a short scale series II that was up for sale a couple of years ago.  I tried to acquire it, but someone in Germany beat me to it.
 
There is another set of inlays I like a lot too.  I remember them being called California Gothic.  I could be wrong about what it is called though.  It consisted of palm trees, crabs, and that sort of stuff.  I like that inlay most.  Anyone know if it is called California Gothic or not?  I wouldn't mind that on my next bass.  Something about those crabs I love.  Maybe neck inlays with just crabs! Hmmm...

malthumb

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2004, 08:56:06 AM »
Poor Nigel,
 
Beautiful instrument.  I could swear that I've seen it somewhere before, but it could've been the one dela217 was referring to.  I love the way the moega looks on four string basses.  More round, and not as stretched as on the 5 and 6 stringers, though those are nice, too.
 
Peace,
 
James
1987 Series I
2000 Mark King Deluxe / Series II 5-string

malthumb

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2004, 08:57:26 AM »
Poor Nigel,
 
Beautiful instrument.  I could swear that I've seen it somewhere before, but it could've been the one dela217 was referring to.  I love the way the omega looks on four string basses.  More round, and not as stretched as on the 5 and 6 stringers, though those are nice, too.
 
Peace,
 
James
1987 Series I
2000 Mark King Deluxe / Series II 5-string

bassman10096

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2004, 03:03:43 PM »
Poor Nigel:
 
What a great looking bass?  Definitely in great shape, well kept, etc. I love the stars inlays.  It's cool seeing them used as the basic inlay shape.  Before this, my favorite neck inlays had been on Starry Night http://alembic.com/info/fc_dm.html.  But yours have more impact by not mixing in ovals with star and moon shapes.  Very Nice!
 
Bill

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2004, 04:15:47 PM »
What I love best about this bass is it's simple elegance.  It is a factory Series II all the way, with stars instead of ovals, in my favorite wood.  Back when I ordered my first bass @ 1980, I asked if they had anything besides ovals and Susan offered me stars.  I opted for the ovals and regretted it.  Well, you are never too old to have a happy childhood.    
 
 
(Message edited by valvil on September 08, 2004)

goatfoot

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2004, 01:36:19 PM »
Hey Nigel,
 
Way back in this thread you said A quick way to tell the condition of a crown-head Alembic is to check the point of the crown. Could you explain this statement, please.  Do you mean to check if the headstock has been banged into something (and thus damaging the point) or did you mean you could somehow examine the condition of the neck or wood?  Also, why would this be different from other headstock Alembics?
 
Thanks.
Kevin

poor_nigel

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2004, 02:14:21 PM »
Hey Kevin:
 
I meant simply that if it belonged to someone who was not always careful when handling it, it is bound to have damage to the point from bumps, etc.  A crown point would be a bit different, as the point is quite easily damaged.  There is little surface area to absorb a knock to it, like on a flat surface.  So the point can get nicked or flattened by just a bump that would not do much to say an Elan peghead taking the same hit.  The point on this particular bass is in mint condition.  
 
The bass on a whole is in very-fine to near-mint condition, depending on how serious you take two pin-head sized dents, one caused by a poor chrome job done to the bird tailpiece, so it gouged into the finish when installed (reinstalled), but not the wood.  You can see the second in the pictures.  It is to the left of the neck pickup.  Again, just in the finish, not in the wood.  There would be almost no gain in a refin, and I like the yellowed finish on the maple.  You can see it is 20 years old, but was always handled carefully.  OK, except for on two occasions . . .

skokiaan

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Series II - SN 84 3267
« Reply #14 on: September 19, 2004, 05:11:08 PM »
I know where I've seen that bass before.... in my living room! I gigged with that bass every weekend for four years. My band dubbed her The Lamborgini. I hated letting her go, and seeing these pictures makes me want her back. {sniff}
I'm glad to see she's in loving hands.