Author Topic: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I  (Read 3853 times)

precarius

  • club
  • Advanced Member
  • *
  • Posts: 373
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2006, 09:18:20 PM »
I vote for Hurricane tribute also. I wouldn't care if they took it all apart and put it back together but using all the same pieces as much as possible. It would make a great story and a priceless heirloom.

precarius

  • club
  • Advanced Member
  • *
  • Posts: 373
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2006, 09:21:06 PM »
You could probably get a million dollars for it on E-Bay right now.

precarius

  • club
  • Advanced Member
  • *
  • Posts: 373
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2006, 10:02:29 PM »
I hate to ramble, but I just looked at the showcase and saw what this bass looked like to start with:
http://club.alembic.com/Images/411/2435.html?1084807001
Wow.

palembic

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2186
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2006, 01:36:10 AM »
Brother Michael  
...good to hear from you. If you still have the samenumber: you will have me on the phone one of these days for a homecoming chat (btw: did the alligators in your backyard return too???)
 
About this bass ...I'd like to share a story with you all.
It will take some time so please sit back and relax if you want to read it. It has NOTHING to do with basses but my point will become clear soon enough (hehehehe ...I DO hope).
 
This goes back to the period that I was a video producer.
I was asked by the conservator Piet Chielens of the In Flanders Field Museum in Ieper (most Americans, Aussies and Great Commonwealth people will know it as 'Ypres') to make a documentary on how to handle in an appropriate way the demolition or loss of a city.
I was a little puzzled when he asked but he asked me on an evening to his place and over some whiskies he told me A Tale of three ...four ?five ?whatever Cities.
 
1. The Ypres case:
as you probably know the town of Ieper in the Western part of Flanders (near the French border there) was completely demolished after World War I. No stone was left upon the other and as was said  a horseman could oversee the total town from the back of his horse'.
A lot of British gave their lives in that severe part of the this war and their was the strong claim of the British government to leave the town as it was ...in ruins. They asked to build a wall around it and keep it as a symbol for all the casualties fallen there and as an sign of honour for England (there was a young parliament member those days Winston Churchill -who fought the trenches of Ieper- who would liked it thatr way).
The Belgian government couldn't live with such a symbol and they would give the town back to the people who lived there before and wipe the memory out. There was an architect asked to rebuild the town. Alas ...the architect was so full of ideas that he reconstructed a town that never has been in the past. He reconstructed he 'medieval look alike' town that has never been there. Ironically: historical research proved that just a FEW of the original people of Ieper came back to their town. The majority was fled to other towns in Flanders and started a new life during the war to forget what happened. Ieper became populated by adventurers and thos who had lost their live on other places.
The Commonwealth War Grave Commission received pieces of land to organize war graves for the fallen soldies, the county of West Flanders is littered with wargraves and EACH of them is official BRITISH territory. Most known is the War Cemetry of Passendale. Please visit www.inflandersfields.be  
Today there is only ONE (just 1) trace of a shell impact visible in the town of Ieper, in a monastery wall behind the church. The town is rebuild to a copy of itself that never was or has been.
 
2. The Oradour-sur-Glane case
Oradour is a small French town near Poitiers.
As a revenge for being attacked by the French resistance, a batallion of SS-Tiger Tanks and SS troups entered the morning of 10 june 1944. All inhabitants were brought together in the church and slaughtered and the Tiger tanks raged through the town shooting and destroying.
After these horrible happenings it seemed that NO ONE would touch the town anymore; nor Germans, nor French, nor resistance, nor Vichy-France, After the war the local authorities would love to start levelling the village and rebuild a new one.
General Charles De Gaulle forbided personally to move one stone in that town. A wall was erected round Oradour and until today you can visit the town as a most macabre testimonial of the horrors of war.  


 
 
3. The Coventry Case
German air raids in WW II were also aimed at civil objectives: towns, cathedrals etc. The cathedral of Coventry was heavy bombed and demolished for a great part.


 
The British government decided to build a new cathedral but ?functionally interweave the ruins of the old cathedral in the highly modern one that was to be build. Old is cherished in new, memories kept by moving on to something new but ?with respect to the the functionality of the place: a house of God and forgiveness. Please see here http://www.know-britain.com/churches/coventry_cathedral_1.html
 
 
I will stop here.
My friend Piet told me that evening also about the fourth city Hiroshima where just the ?Dome? left completely intact after the first atom bomb.  And about a fifth city Rotterdam where the government decided to build a completely new city ready for the future. Until today Rotterdam is one of the most modern cities in the Netherlands. I can talk about Dresden in Germany and the firestorms after the bombing etc ?
You my brothers and sisters can talk about the horror-story on 9/11 in New York.
 
We have difficulties to live with memories and make things work.
 
Brother Michael ?sorry for this looooooooooooo-oong typical Paul the bad one story. I felt like writing and sharing this morning.
I leave it to your and Mica?s wisdom. Please remember one thing: the instrument is made to play upon. I know there are a lot of modern techniques but this bass will have a story to tell musically and just by being an object.
With the skills of the Elfs at Alembic ?it will turn out the right way ?I just know that.
 
Paul the bad one
 
(Message edited by palembic on January 27, 2006)
 
(Message edited by palembic on January 27, 2006)

jacko

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3839
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2006, 02:07:50 AM »
Micheal.
I'd go for the Hurricane tribute - Just get the bass back to playing condition but leaving it with its battle scars.  
 
graeme

David Houck

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12535
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2006, 06:23:42 AM »
Paul; nice post!  Thanks!

dela217

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1052
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2006, 06:24:24 AM »
My feeling is for the tribute style too.  That is why I was comparing it to George Washington's hatchet.  You know, the one he chopped down the cherry tree with.  It is still in great condition, but over the years the handle has been replaced twice, and the blade has been replaced too.  
 
I am going to call the elves soon so we can talk it over.
 
Michael
 
(Message edited by dela217 on January 27, 2006)

tom_z

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 637
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2006, 08:11:28 AM »
Brother Paul, that was a splendid and most appropriate post.
 
Michael, best of luck with your decisions regarding this wonderful instrument.
 
I'll follow this thread with great interest.
 
=) Tom

george_wright

  • club
  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 158
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2006, 10:11:30 AM »
Tom said quote:I'll follow this thread with great interest. And so will I.  The before and after contrast is stark!
 
Michael, was this instrument insured?  If so, does it look like the carrier will pay for repairs?

mica

  • alembic
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8932
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2006, 10:31:34 AM »
I thought the cherry tree was a myth - this bass really did suffer, but the comparison is valid.
 
It's really hard to tell from the pictures, but the neck's stability is worrisome. I attempted to show the condition, but it's just at a difficult angle to capture the damage. In some places, there is close to a 1/8 difference in height between the Maple and Walnut laminates - it's extreme.  
 
Perhaps we could approach the project in stages, first more cleaning with oil, doing some restorative work on the body, and repairing the existing neck and hoping for the best. Only considering replacement if it actually fails in service. We can always repair it more in the future.
 
Thanks for all your thoughts on this project. It's a labor of love, we were moved to assist in its restoration to help our old friend who lost so much.

811952

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2499
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #25 on: January 27, 2006, 11:51:01 AM »
I think leaving it to sit and dry out for a year before doing anything to it wouldn't be a bad idea.  As the woods reach a point of moisture-content stability, I would guess that they would somewhat shrink and return to their pre-bath size and fit.
 
John

keith_h

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2700
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #26 on: January 27, 2006, 02:05:31 PM »
I'm sorry about the loss. I noticed white deposits like I would expect to see from salt water. If it is then I would suggest a conservator be contacted to discuss leaching the salts out of the wood (such as soaking in distilled water?). If salts have leached into the wood they will continue to leach out and/or eat at the wood whenever it exposed to moisture. I'm by no means knowledgeable in this area but have read about similar situations.  
 
Keith

valvil

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 880
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #27 on: January 27, 2006, 04:04:52 PM »
I've already told Michael over the phone, but I figured the rest of you would be intrigued by the fact that the electronics do work, somewhat. The bridge pickup is not working and there's consistent hum when you dial it in on the selector switch, but the neck pickup sounds great!
 
Valentino

David Houck

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12535
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #28 on: January 27, 2006, 04:09:33 PM »
Thanks Val!

lbpesq

  • club
  • Senior Member
  • *
  • Posts: 6769
Re: Resurrecting Michael's Hurricane Damaged Series I
« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2006, 08:10:54 PM »
Alembic:  Takes a licking and keeps on ticking!  Where is John Cameron Swayze when you need him?
 
Bill, tgo